Original Research

Evaluation of metabolic changes in clinic attendees with therapeutic carbohydrate restriction

Kirsty Woods, Hilmi S. Rathomi, Thomas L. Smith, Nahal Mavaddat, Judith Katzenellenbogen
Journal of Metabolic Health | Vol 7, No 1 | a94 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jmh.v7i1.94 | © 2024 Kirsty Woods, Hilmi S. Rathomi, Thomas L. Smith, Nahal Mavaddat, Judith Katzenellenbogen | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 December 2023 | Published: 10 May 2024

About the author(s)

Kirsty Woods, Metabolic Health Solutions, Perth, Australia; and, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Ralph and Patricia Sarich Neuroscience Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
Hilmi S. Rathomi, School of Population and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; and, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Islam Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia
Thomas L. Smith, Metabolic Health Solutions, Perth, Australia
Nahal Mavaddat, Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
Judith Katzenellenbogen, School of Population and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia

Abstract

Background: Obesity and related metabolic health disorders are major clinical problems that have become increasingly prevalent worldwide.

Aim: This before-after study examined the impact of therapeutic carbohydrate restriction (TCR) in managing metabolic health and promoting weight loss in a clinical setting using indirect calorimetry (IC).

Setting: Data were collected from medical records obtained from a specialised allied health clinic focusing on metabolic health.

Methods: The study analysed retrospective data from 202 overweight or obese participants (77% female, mean age 47.3) who received TCR as part of a behavioural modification programme involving multiple visits where their lifestyle, body composition and respiratory quotient (RQ), a key indicator of fat oxidation were recorded.

Results: The study found that TCR improved fat oxidation in 84% of participants at short term visit (around 2 weeks), with an average weight loss of 1.8 kg. At medium term visit (around 12 weeks), 82% of participants maintained an increase in fat oxidation rate, with an average weight loss of 3.9 kg. In addition, among those with recorded body composition and waist circumference, 71% of weight lost was from fat, with an average reduction of 4.9 cm in waist measurements.

Conclusion: This real-world study suggests that personalised TCR guided by IC can be an effective strategy for improving metabolic flexibility to help manage excess weight and related co-morbidities in a free-living population. Further research is needed to examine the long-term effects of TCR using this approach.

Contribution: The utilisation of IC allows for the examination of individual shifts and improvements in metabolism among patients undergoing TCR.

 


Keywords

carbohydrate restriction; fat oxidation; indirect calorimetry; obesity; weight loss; metabolic flexibility; lifestyle

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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